The only thing missing in this picture is you!

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 “When you're younger you don't think that a sedentary lifestyle is going to catch up with you.  My headaches were getting worse.  My clothes weren't fitting well.  My confidence was starting to decline a little bit.  I had sciatic pain, back pain, neck pain.  At the end of the day you’re like, "All right something has to give."  I have suffered from Migraines for 20 years now.  Sometimes they're not as bad, other times I’ll have them for seven days.  To the point where I'm calling out at work two or three days in a row.  Sitting in a dark room covers over my head, nauseous, throwing up.  It's was terrible.  I've been on prescription medication after prescription medication.  I've gotten my wisdom teeth pulled.  I had LASIK eye surgery.  I've done literally everything that I could think of.  I mean to the point where the neurologist basically said, "Well you've got migraines.  It's just part of your life.  There's no cure for that and you'll just have to deal with it."  I tried to learn as much as I could about nutrition at RD.  That really intrigued me.  I’ve always been a pretty healthy eater but I think the main reason was to try and pinpoint my migraine triggers.  In doing the nutrition and kind of stripping it down and just really following the rules, I was able to figure out what foods could set off a migraine.  When I started avoiding processed foods, sugar, too much dairy, and white bread, i noticed I felt so much better.  My skin improved.  I was more confident. I was less bloated.  In doing that you feel so much better.  If I avoid these foods, I found I didn’t have any headaches at all.  I have times that I fall off the wagon, but the fact that I was able to find a way to avoid migraines, allowed me to control my own life for the first time in two decades!”  -Christine C of Monroe, NY

“When you're younger you don't think that a sedentary lifestyle is going to catch up with you. My headaches were getting worse. My clothes weren't fitting well. My confidence was starting to decline a little bit. I had sciatic pain, back pain, neck pain. At the end of the day you’re like, "All right something has to give."

I have suffered from Migraines for 20 years now. Sometimes they're not as bad, other times I’ll have them for seven days. To the point where I'm calling out at work two or three days in a row. Sitting in a dark room covers over my head, nauseous, throwing up. It's was terrible. I've been on prescription medication after prescription medication. I've gotten my wisdom teeth pulled. I had LASIK eye surgery. I've done literally everything that I could think of. I mean to the point where the neurologist basically said, "Well you've got migraines. It's just part of your life. There's no cure for that and you'll just have to deal with it."

I tried to learn as much as I could about nutrition at RD. That really intrigued me. I’ve always been a pretty healthy eater but I think the main reason was to try and pinpoint my migraine triggers. In doing the nutrition and kind of stripping it down and just really following the rules, I was able to figure out what foods could set off a migraine.

When I started avoiding processed foods, sugar, too much dairy, and white bread, i noticed I felt so much better. My skin improved. I was more confident. I was less bloated. In doing that you feel so much better. If I avoid these foods, I found I didn’t have any headaches at all. I have times that I fall off the wagon, but the fact that I was able to find a way to avoid migraines, allowed me to control my own life for the first time in two decades!”

-Christine C of Monroe, NY

 
 “I saw my mom struggling with her physical freedom. Walking was her passion, but she was losing her ability to get around. She was falling because of her Alzheimer's and she was not recovering due to osteoporosis. I saw that happening to my mom and I realized I needed to make changes in my lifestyle.  My kids were constantly exercising and working out and they stayed motivated. They actually tried to encourage me to do more but every time I started I would get side tracked by pain. Getting hurt was a big deal for me. It slowed me down and then I couldn't take care of my mom. That became a vicious cycle until I finally stopped into RD. Since then, the coaches have helped me stay healthy. I have not had an exercise-related injury and now my kids are noticing that I am healthier.  When my kids come home they say, "Mom you look really healthy, you look strong." So that's my motivation. In the past, I always wanted them to stay fit and exercise, now they hold me accountable.  It has come full circle. Now with my grandchildren, I am able to lift them over my head. I'm able to take them to the beach. I'm able to crawl with them on the jungle gyms. It's been a wonderful journey for me here because I feel stronger. At my age, staying healthy and being able to feel balanced and strong is very important to me.”  -Terri T of Monroe, NY

“I saw my mom struggling with her physical freedom. Walking was her passion, but she was losing her ability to get around. She was falling because of her Alzheimer's and she was not recovering due to osteoporosis. I saw that happening to my mom and I realized I needed to make changes in my lifestyle.

My kids were constantly exercising and working out and they stayed motivated. They actually tried to encourage me to do more but every time I started I would get side tracked by pain. Getting hurt was a big deal for me. It slowed me down and then I couldn't take care of my mom. That became a vicious cycle until I finally stopped into RD. Since then, the coaches have helped me stay healthy. I have not had an exercise-related injury and now my kids are noticing that I am healthier.

When my kids come home they say, "Mom you look really healthy, you look strong." So that's my motivation. In the past, I always wanted them to stay fit and exercise, now they hold me accountable.

It has come full circle. Now with my grandchildren, I am able to lift them over my head. I'm able to take them to the beach. I'm able to crawl with them on the jungle gyms. It's been a wonderful journey for me here because I feel stronger. At my age, staying healthy and being able to feel balanced and strong is very important to me.”

-Terri T of Monroe, NY

 
 "In 2015 my husband had two stem cell transplants back-to-back. I was working full-time, back and forth to the hospital, and really just running myself. I needed to do that because I needed to take care of the children and I needed to take care of him.  In the midst of doing that, I just felt tired, exhausted, and almost like I was losing sight of myself and who I am and what I needed to be to take care of them. I missed the exercise part. I missed the feeling that I get when I exercise. I missed feeling strong.  It was really the chemo and stem cell transplants. Watching Steve, he has always been physically fit. A lot of physical bodies could not endure the medical treatment that he had to sustain. Watching him power through it without even looking back, it was so inspirational because he never complained. He said, “This is what I’ve got to do. I’m all in.”  In watching him do that, I saw him accomplish something that a lot of people can’t recover from. Then he lived a normal life. Then it came time to do it again, and then he lived a normal life. I reflected to myself, ‘If that were me, could I do that? Am I that physically fit that my body would bounce back and recover like that?’  The reflection was important. The need for self care. That is one piece of advice I have for young mothers: take the time for yourself. I always thought it was selfish to leave my kids after working all day to come to the gym for an hour. I learned that I’m a better person when I walk through that door after coming to RD because I’ve taken an hour out of the day for myself."  —Jodi F of Central Valley, NY

"In 2015 my husband had two stem cell transplants back-to-back. I was working full-time, back and forth to the hospital, and really just running myself. I needed to do that because I needed to take care of the children and I needed to take care of him.

In the midst of doing that, I just felt tired, exhausted, and almost like I was losing sight of myself and who I am and what I needed to be to take care of them. I missed the exercise part. I missed the feeling that I get when I exercise. I missed feeling strong.

It was really the chemo and stem cell transplants. Watching Steve, he has always been physically fit. A lot of physical bodies could not endure the medical treatment that he had to sustain. Watching him power through it without even looking back, it was so inspirational because he never complained. He said, “This is what I’ve got to do. I’m all in.”

In watching him do that, I saw him accomplish something that a lot of people can’t recover from. Then he lived a normal life. Then it came time to do it again, and then he lived a normal life. I reflected to myself, ‘If that were me, could I do that? Am I that physically fit that my body would bounce back and recover like that?’

The reflection was important. The need for self care. That is one piece of advice I have for young mothers: take the time for yourself. I always thought it was selfish to leave my kids after working all day to come to the gym for an hour. I learned that I’m a better person when I walk through that door after coming to RD because I’ve taken an hour out of the day for myself."

—Jodi F of Central Valley, NY

 
 "My life challenge for me was many things actually, but I had Leukemia. I should say I have Leukemia, but I’m in remission.  I was terrified before I knew. When I went to the hematologist, I was terrified, my mouth was dry, I couldn’t even talk. And then, once I learned I had it, that day when I was on my way to the hospital I thought, “There’s something seriously wrong with me, and I don’t know what’s going to happen. I could die. I’ll just go through it and see what happens.”  So that was kind of my attitude about it; to just go with what they’re (the doctors) telling you. Don’t ask what the future holds, because I don’t know what the future holds, and especially with Leukemia because it could come back. Even knowing I’ll be in remission or considered “cured” in October, it could still come back. It is what it is; it’s that type of disease.  But I suppose my takeaway was to not stop living. I never stopped. I thought, “This is my life. I’m still here. I’m going to just live. I’m not going to give up and, you know, fall apart and ask ‘Why did this happen to me?’”  I think I’ve always had a positive attitude or I never give up hope. I don’t know if it’s just me, but I just don’t like to give up. I would rather be happy. It’s a better way to be in life. Maybe it’s a choice, I don’t want to be negative, I don’t want to be miserable."  —Sue P. of Monroe, NY

"My life challenge for me was many things actually, but I had Leukemia. I should say I have Leukemia, but I’m in remission.

I was terrified before I knew. When I went to the hematologist, I was terrified, my mouth was dry, I couldn’t even talk. And then, once I learned I had it, that day when I was on my way to the hospital I thought, “There’s something seriously wrong with me, and I don’t know what’s going to happen. I could die. I’ll just go through it and see what happens.”

So that was kind of my attitude about it; to just go with what they’re (the doctors) telling you. Don’t ask what the future holds, because I don’t know what the future holds, and especially with Leukemia because it could come back. Even knowing I’ll be in remission or considered “cured” in October, it could still come back. It is what it is; it’s that type of disease.

But I suppose my takeaway was to not stop living. I never stopped. I thought, “This is my life. I’m still here. I’m going to just live. I’m not going to give up and, you know, fall apart and ask ‘Why did this happen to me?’”

I think I’ve always had a positive attitude or I never give up hope. I don’t know if it’s just me, but I just don’t like to give up. I would rather be happy. It’s a better way to be in life. Maybe it’s a choice, I don’t want to be negative, I don’t want to be miserable."

—Sue P. of Monroe, NY

 
 "The reason I initially came to RD was because my daughter was pregnant and I waited a very long time to have my first grandchild. They live in New York City and I had committed to babysitting once a week, traveling to New York City. We leave our house at 5:30 in the morning and we don’t come back until very late at night, so it’s a long day.  We’re very short, small people, but my granddaughter was huge! 96th percentile for height and 75th for weight. So I wanted to be able to work with her, help her, and now that she’s walking, run around with her. She’s become the center of our lives at this point.  If you’re not healthy and you’re not strong, there’s no way in the world you can keep up with grand-children. People that I know that are much younger than me, that haven’t exercised and haven’t watched their nutrition, they can’t enjoy their grandchildren. They can’t participate with their activities like someone who has taken better care of them-selves along the way."  —Sue G. of Washingtonville, NY

"The reason I initially came to RD was because my daughter was pregnant and I waited a very long time to have my first grandchild. They live in New York City and I had committed to babysitting once a week, traveling to New York City. We leave our house at 5:30 in the morning and we don’t come back until very late at night, so it’s a long day.

We’re very short, small people, but my granddaughter was huge! 96th percentile for height and 75th for weight. So I wanted to be able to work with her, help her, and now that she’s walking, run around with her. She’s become the center of our lives at this point.

If you’re not healthy and you’re not strong, there’s no way in the world you can keep up with grand-children. People that I know that are much younger than me, that haven’t exercised and haven’t watched their nutrition, they can’t enjoy their grandchildren. They can’t participate with their activities like someone who has taken better care of them-selves along the way."

—Sue G. of Washingtonville, NY

 
 "When I see people say, “Oh, I can’t do that.” I think, you can do it if you try, and if you don’t feel like you’re physically fit to do it, there’s an answer to that if you pursue it. I don’t want to be restricted.  Kevin and I just started taking ballroom dancing. That’s something we always talked about that’s a workout, and we want to continue to do it. If we’re not active, if we’re not physically fit and mentally too, then you turn off. You turn off every night and then that’s the lifestyle that you lead, is just to come home and turn off.  I have two jet skis sitting on the dock that I feel like I’m twelve years old again when I ride them, and that feels good when I’m flying across the lake. I want to do those fun things together with my family. That’s a whole other part of my life that started. I’m seeing my family grow and I want to be a part of them doing those things. I might be involved in a different way, but I want to see them enjoy that too. I don’t want to say, “I’m getting older.” Maybe some day there’ll be things I don’t want to do, but I don’t know. I want to keep trying things."  —Mary D. of Highland Mills, NY

"When I see people say, “Oh, I can’t do that.” I think, you can do it if you try, and if you don’t feel like you’re physically fit to do it, there’s an answer to that if you pursue it. I don’t want to be restricted.

Kevin and I just started taking ballroom dancing. That’s something we always talked about that’s a workout, and we want to continue to do it. If we’re not active, if we’re not physically fit and mentally too, then you turn off. You turn off every night and then that’s the lifestyle that you lead, is just to come home and turn off.

I have two jet skis sitting on the dock that I feel like I’m twelve years old again when I ride them, and that feels good when I’m flying across the lake. I want to do those fun things together with my family. That’s a whole other part of my life that started. I’m seeing my family grow and I want to be a part of them doing those things. I might be involved in a different way, but I want to see them enjoy that too. I don’t want to say, “I’m getting older.” Maybe some day there’ll be things I don’t want to do, but I don’t know. I want to keep trying things."

—Mary D. of Highland Mills, NY

 
 "Two years ago my father passed away. I watched him have a lot of difficulty. From the age of 70-75 his health declined rapidly; he could barely get out of a chair, he had chronic pain, he could barely move. Granted, he had a prosthetic leg, but there are plenty of people with prosthetic legs that can do all sorts of things.  I think after his passing I kind of started to look back at myself and the fact that I could barely move my shoulders, my elbow was stiff, and I had carpel tunnel in both hands. It seemed like a prudent time to start doing something. It was to the point that I would try to close the windows in the house and I could barely do it because there would be this shooting pain down my arm. At age 40, there was no reason for me to be in that kind of state.  The first thing I did was start eating better. I did some physical therapy for the elbow, which helped, then I tried to start up at a traditional gym, but it didn’t stick. I wound up coming to Results Driven. Through doing a lot of the movement training we do at RD, my shoulders got 100 times better. I am stronger than I could have ever imagined, and I regained control of my life."  —Joe S of Monroe, NY

"Two years ago my father passed away. I watched him have a lot of difficulty. From the age of 70-75 his health declined rapidly; he could barely get out of a chair, he had chronic pain, he could barely move. Granted, he had a prosthetic leg, but there are plenty of people with prosthetic legs that can do all sorts of things.

I think after his passing I kind of started to look back at myself and the fact that I could barely move my shoulders, my elbow was stiff, and I had carpel tunnel in both hands. It seemed like a prudent time to start doing something. It was to the point that I would try to close the windows in the house and I could barely do it because there would be this shooting pain down my arm. At age 40, there was no reason for me to be in that kind of state.

The first thing I did was start eating better. I did some physical therapy for the elbow, which helped, then I tried to start up at a traditional gym, but it didn’t stick. I wound up coming to Results Driven. Through doing a lot of the movement training we do at RD, my shoulders got 100 times better. I am stronger than I could have ever imagined, and I regained control of my life."

—Joe S of Monroe, NY

 
 "So, one of the things that we talk about at RD is, 'what is your ‘why’?'  As a mom, two of my 'whys' are my daughters, Meghan and Lori. Another one is my grandmother. She’s 90 and she is like the energizer bunny. There’s nothing that grandma won’t help you with. She’s awesome. She wants to do the wash, the ironing, the dishes, mop the floors - she’s just a very active person.   So, even though she grew up in a generation that didn’t “go to the gym,” she just always did these movements in her regular life, being an active person, that at 90 she’s still going strong.  She’s just such an inspiration to be able to do that, since I’m not outside milking the cow and bailing hay, and doing the things that she did when she was a little girl growing up on the farm. I come here and learn to lift heavy things, and hinge and deadlift, and plank and swing. All of those things help me to be strong physically, and I’m hoping, God willing, I can reap the benefits of that later on because I think that’s just such a key for her."  —Stephanie P. of Monroe, NY

"So, one of the things that we talk about at RD is, 'what is your ‘why’?'

As a mom, two of my 'whys' are my daughters, Meghan and Lori. Another one is my grandmother. She’s 90 and she is like the energizer bunny. There’s nothing that grandma won’t help you with. She’s awesome. She wants to do the wash, the ironing, the dishes, mop the floors - she’s just a very active person.

So, even though she grew up in a generation that didn’t “go to the gym,” she just always did these movements in her regular life, being an active person, that at 90 she’s still going strong.

She’s just such an inspiration to be able to do that, since I’m not outside milking the cow and bailing hay, and doing the things that she did when she was a little girl growing up on the farm. I come here and learn to lift heavy things, and hinge and deadlift, and plank and swing. All of those things help me to be strong physically, and I’m hoping, God willing, I can reap the benefits of that later on because I think that’s just such a key for her."

—Stephanie P. of Monroe, NY

 
 "A few years ago my sister committed suicide. She was a Chicago police officer. She was about 4' 11", weighed less than 100 lbs, and about sixteen years before then she had gotten injured on the job, which resulted in tremendous nerve damage in her lower part of her body. She went through surgeries, procedures, everything that was offered all over the country to get relief, but the nerve damage was so great that nothing really worked.  When she passed away I wasn't surprised, I was just grateful that she hung on as long as she did for us, because that's what she did.  From that, understanding the psychological, physical, and emotional pain that takes on somebody, I started getting worried as I got older even before she had passed that if I'm not moving enough, I could do something wrong, and I was- I was falling. I would walk off of a ledge, off of a curb, twist my foot and I would fall. So I knew I was headed for broken hip, broken shoulder, surgeries, and I was very deathly afraid of that.  So from the death of my sister, although I started trying to work out, whip myself back into shape, I was still getting injured. I started getting nerve pain in my feet. I went through a lot to try and figure that out. While I was going to all of these physical therapy and doctor appointments and getting MRIs, I was working with Ed and with Kyle, and come to find out, really it was more muscular skeletal, which was a relief because that pain was starting to get me severely depressed. Since coming to RD and working with them, I've come to realize that I no longer have a future of being trapped within my mind and within this pain. It was like a door was opened. I'm so grateful to be here."  —Kim A. of Monroe, NY

"A few years ago my sister committed suicide. She was a Chicago police officer. She was about 4' 11", weighed less than 100 lbs, and about sixteen years before then she had gotten injured on the job, which resulted in tremendous nerve damage in her lower part of her body. She went through surgeries, procedures, everything that was offered all over the country to get relief, but the nerve damage was so great that nothing really worked.

When she passed away I wasn't surprised, I was just grateful that she hung on as long as she did for us, because that's what she did.

From that, understanding the psychological, physical, and emotional pain that takes on somebody, I started getting worried as I got older even before she had passed that if I'm not moving enough, I could do something wrong, and I was- I was falling. I would walk off of a ledge, off of a curb, twist my foot and I would fall. So I knew I was headed for broken hip, broken shoulder, surgeries, and I was very deathly afraid of that.

So from the death of my sister, although I started trying to work out, whip myself back into shape, I was still getting injured. I started getting nerve pain in my feet. I went through a lot to try and figure that out. While I was going to all of these physical therapy and doctor appointments and getting MRIs, I was working with Ed and with Kyle, and come to find out, really it was more muscular skeletal, which was a relief because that pain was starting to get me severely depressed. Since coming to RD and working with them, I've come to realize that I no longer have a future of being trapped within my mind and within this pain. It was like a door was opened. I'm so grateful to be here."

—Kim A. of Monroe, NY

 
 "About nine years ago, I started having some really horrific pains in my neck, my shoulders, down the sides of my back, my low back, my hip; I mean I was just falling apart and I didn't know what it was. So, I just thought, “Oh, I need to exercise more.” And of course, I did, and I did it all wrong, so I just made everything worse. Came to find out that I eventually needed spine surgery, but before spine surgery, I had done physical therapy and it wasn't working.  After the spine surgery, I did more physical therapy and it only worked a little bit. I was coming from a place where I always exercised, even if I did it the wrong way, but I was always into that. Now, to be in a place where even taking a walk around the block was painful for me, I felt very hopeless, but still determined. I hadn't given up, but I was ready.  Results Driven really saved my life. They're a big part of how I got my life back. It wouldn't have happened without them and so to have been that low and now to be here, there are no words to describe it. I'm just so grateful and I'll never be able to let them know just how grateful I am for that. How do you thank somebody for giving you your life back?"  —Elfi L. of Monroe, NY

"About nine years ago, I started having some really horrific pains in my neck, my shoulders, down the sides of my back, my low back, my hip; I mean I was just falling apart and I didn't know what it was. So, I just thought, “Oh, I need to exercise more.” And of course, I did, and I did it all wrong, so I just made everything worse. Came to find out that I eventually needed spine surgery, but before spine surgery, I had done physical therapy and it wasn't working.

After the spine surgery, I did more physical therapy and it only worked a little bit. I was coming from a place where I always exercised, even if I did it the wrong way, but I was always into that. Now, to be in a place where even taking a walk around the block was painful for me, I felt very hopeless, but still determined. I hadn't given up, but I was ready.

Results Driven really saved my life. They're a big part of how I got my life back. It wouldn't have happened without them and so to have been that low and now to be here, there are no words to describe it. I'm just so grateful and I'll never be able to let them know just how grateful I am for that. How do you thank somebody for giving you your life back?"

—Elfi L. of Monroe, NY

 
 "I believe when you feel good, you look good!  I always felt like I wasn’t really in shape, so was inspired to try RD because it was different than all of the other gyms. I have to say I didn’t love it at first, but then the different workouts won me over. I started having more energy, and not having that beat up feeling I had after working out at other gyms.  I hope to get stronger and continue to learn better eating habits. I have three boys, I need to be stronger than them so I can kick their asses!"  —Kathy R. of Monroe, NY

"I believe when you feel good, you look good!

I always felt like I wasn’t really in shape, so was inspired to try RD because it was different than all of the other gyms. I have to say I didn’t love it at first, but then the different workouts won me over. I started having more energy, and not having that beat up feeling I had after working out at other gyms.

I hope to get stronger and continue to learn better eating habits. I have three boys, I need to be stronger than them so I can kick their asses!"

—Kathy R. of Monroe, NY

 
 "This transition feels like the biggest responsibility of my life. As you get older, you go through different challenges that add value to your life, whether it’s school, entering adulthood, getting a job, buying a house; all things that I’ve personally experienced. But there’s something completely different when I’m literally growing a human inside of me, and then knowing I have to take care of a human for the rest of my years. It’s a real mashup of feelings and emotions. Whether I feel super excited, nervous, or am going through bodily changes that makes me feel, at times, like a different person, I still have to figure out how to find the energy to take care of myself and still bring value to my clients.  Now that I’m approaching motherhood, there has definitely been a change in mindset and how I approach my role as a coach. I feel like the more experiences you have in life the more relatable you become, and at the end of the day, that’s what we’re looking to do. We want to build relationships and show how much we care about coaching and our clients. Before, I felt like I did not have any insight into what it’s like to have a child or just care about someone so much more than yourself. That’s the ultimate feeling; having that person. You care about your friends and family, sometimes even more than yourself, but being a mother brings it to another level. I think from a coach’s perspective, it’s definitely changing me already. I’ve always cared, but now it just gives me that extra motivation for myself, but also in helping other people try to maintain the health and fitness they need to be strong for their family."   —Coach Kim of Monroe, NY

"This transition feels like the biggest responsibility of my life. As you get older, you go through different challenges that add value to your life, whether it’s school, entering adulthood, getting a job, buying a house; all things that I’ve personally experienced. But there’s something completely different when I’m literally growing a human inside of me, and then knowing I have to take care of a human for the rest of my years. It’s a real mashup of feelings and emotions. Whether I feel super excited, nervous, or am going through bodily changes that makes me feel, at times, like a different person, I still have to figure out how to find the energy to take care of myself and still bring value to my clients.

Now that I’m approaching motherhood, there has definitely been a change in mindset and how I approach my role as a coach. I feel like the more experiences you have in life the more relatable you become, and at the end of the day, that’s what we’re looking to do. We want to build relationships and show how much we care about coaching and our clients. Before, I felt like I did not have any insight into what it’s like to have a child or just care about someone so much more than yourself. That’s the ultimate feeling; having that person. You care about your friends and family, sometimes even more than yourself, but being a mother brings it to another level. I think from a coach’s perspective, it’s definitely changing me already. I’ve always cared, but now it just gives me that extra motivation for myself, but also in helping other people try to maintain the health and fitness they need to be strong for their family."

—Coach Kim of Monroe, NY

 
 "When I was younger, the reason I wanted to start exercising was because of when I was overweight, out of shape and suffered social consequences as a result of that in high school.  I picked up some exercise in college when I played intramural sports. Then after college, the real thing that got me involved in exercising was when I was in the Army. When I got out of the Army and was in law school, I started to run on my own, and what I realized is not only did it keep my weight down, I felt better. After I went for a run I’d feel great.  Now at 70 years old, I think that on any given day that I come to the gym I can be sure that the best I feel that day is when I leave the gym after I’ve exercised. My hope is to remain functional; I want to be able to do all the things I can do now for as long as I can.  Recently I painted the deck at our house; I cleaned it, scraped it, sanded it, and then painted it. We had probably 100 spindles that I had to paint that are part of a porch. Plus simple things like carrying groceries, working around the yard. I’ve had some trees that have come down, cutting those up and getting rid of the tree stumps. It’s all energy consuming, but I’m able to do it.  I hope that it extends my life. Both of my parents passed away from health related issues. I don’t want to die when I’m 72; I hope exercise keeps me healthy."  —Steve T. of Newburgh, NY

"When I was younger, the reason I wanted to start exercising was because of when I was overweight, out of shape and suffered social consequences as a result of that in high school.

I picked up some exercise in college when I played intramural sports. Then after college, the real thing that got me involved in exercising was when I was in the Army. When I got out of the Army and was in law school, I started to run on my own, and what I realized is not only did it keep my weight down, I felt better. After I went for a run I’d feel great.

Now at 70 years old, I think that on any given day that I come to the gym I can be sure that the best I feel that day is when I leave the gym after I’ve exercised. My hope is to remain functional; I want to be able to do all the things I can do now for as long as I can.

Recently I painted the deck at our house; I cleaned it, scraped it, sanded it, and then painted it. We had probably 100 spindles that I had to paint that are part of a porch. Plus simple things like carrying groceries, working around the yard. I’ve had some trees that have come down, cutting those up and getting rid of the tree stumps. It’s all energy consuming, but I’m able to do it.

I hope that it extends my life. Both of my parents passed away from health related issues. I don’t want to die when I’m 72; I hope exercise keeps me healthy."

—Steve T. of Newburgh, NY

 
 "What’s my fitness motivation? Well, I’ve always believed in a healthier lifestyle and exercise. I used to work out five days a week, but about three years ago, life got busy.  My kids were busy with high school and college. Add to that my normal responsibilities, plus, I wasn’t planning on it, but I left my job because I was unhappy. All of this happened at the worst possible time. The next year, I literally opened up my business the week my son was graduating high school. It was a nightmare.  After a while I thought, “Okay, I’m juggling way too many balls in the air. I’m sluggish and nothing I’m doing is at my optimum best because it starts with me.” My health was suffering. What I was putting into my family, my career, and my friendships; everything just started to not be good.  I kind of turned my back on everything I knew and I just couldn’t make that connection to get started again. Then, my husband was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. That was when I realized my husband and I had been so involved in our kids lives and being busy that we had put ourselves on the back burner and left ourselves open to not being here."    —June D. of Highland Mills, NY

"What’s my fitness motivation? Well, I’ve always believed in a healthier lifestyle and exercise. I used to work out five days a week, but about three years ago, life got busy.

My kids were busy with high school and college. Add to that my normal responsibilities, plus, I wasn’t planning on it, but I left my job because I was unhappy. All of this happened at the worst possible time. The next year, I literally opened up my business the week my son was graduating high school. It was a nightmare.

After a while I thought, “Okay, I’m juggling way too many balls in the air. I’m sluggish and nothing I’m doing is at my optimum best because it starts with me.” My health was suffering. What I was putting into my family, my career, and my friendships; everything just started to not be good.

I kind of turned my back on everything I knew and I just couldn’t make that connection to get started again. Then, my husband was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. That was when I realized my husband and I had been so involved in our kids lives and being busy that we had put ourselves on the back burner and left ourselves open to not being here."

—June D. of Highland Mills, NY

 
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"This is where my fitness process started. I was just training to move and feel better. This was something I sent to Coach Ed one of my first weeks at RD.

A couple of years later, when my husband was diagnosed with cancer, I realized how profound this was.  We have been on a two year roller coaster of treatment, surgery, recurrence and more treatment.

I credit training at RD, and learning to trust in the process, and being patient with the process on the way to achieving my personal fitness goals with helping me handle the stress and frustration that I’m dealing with in my personal life. Really, when you think about it, treating cancer is the ultimate “process” and my job as caregiver is to stay strong, sane and focused for my husband.

RD has also served as an escape for me; a release valve. For four hours a week, I can suspend reality and work on improving myself. I am physically stronger and more energized than I have ever been in my life and I think that’s a great thing to be able to say at 47. I’m so jazzed to keep improving.  Spending time at the gym elevates my mood and makes me a better human with more to give."

—Sam B. of Harriman, NY

 
 "For me personally, I feel that strength gives me confidence and that when my body’s strong, it makes me feel good. And if I feel good about myself, then I feel more productive.  As a matter of fact, I credited my physical strength in helping me get ahead in my career. Recently, I was promoted to the head of the English department at German International School of New York, where I work. They were not going to give me the position for whatever reason and I said, “Well, you know, I have options. If you’re not going to give me the position, then I will go some place else and I will take all of my talent with me.” And they gave me the position. I don’t know if I would have done that before.  Since I know I’m strong, I know how much I can go through, so I really don’t let people push me around. I think that strength and fitness is a mind-body-spirit connection for me.  I’ve been through a lot of hardship in my adult life, and when you go through a lot of adversity, you don’t feel like you have control. Being physically fit is something I do have control over. For me, it is a way of maintaining balance physically and spiritually."  —Leslie H. of Chester, NY

"For me personally, I feel that strength gives me confidence and that when my body’s strong, it makes me feel good. And if I feel good about myself, then I feel more productive.

As a matter of fact, I credited my physical strength in helping me get ahead in my career. Recently, I was promoted to the head of the English department at German International School of New York, where I work. They were not going to give me the position for whatever reason and I said, “Well, you know, I have options. If you’re not going to give me the position, then I will go some place else and I will take all of my talent with me.” And they gave me the position. I don’t know if I would have done that before.

Since I know I’m strong, I know how much I can go through, so I really don’t let people push me around. I think that strength and fitness is a mind-body-spirit connection for me.

I’ve been through a lot of hardship in my adult life, and when you go through a lot of adversity, you don’t feel like you have control. Being physically fit is something I do have control over. For me, it is a way of maintaining balance physically and spiritually."

—Leslie H. of Chester, NY

 
 "I think what motivates me in exercise are my own personal struggles with polycystic ovarian syndrome. When I found out what was going on with me with PCOS, I had done some research. I saw a lot of images and read stories about the women who didn’t take any steps to help themselves, and the struggles that they faced because eventually their health collapsed.  When I was first told that I would have a really hard time losing weight because of what I’m dealing with as someone with PCOS, I felt really discouraged, and I feel like I was overworking myself while trying to lose weight.  For a long time I’ve wanted to be the healthiest version of myself in order to avoid as much risk as I possibly can. I knew that I could either live like the women I had read about, or I could work really hard to get to a place where I feel healthy and confident about living the rest of my life."  —Kelly M. of Monroe, NY

"I think what motivates me in exercise are my own personal struggles with polycystic ovarian syndrome. When I found out what was going on with me with PCOS, I had done some research. I saw a lot of images and read stories about the women who didn’t take any steps to help themselves, and the struggles that they faced because eventually their health collapsed.

When I was first told that I would have a really hard time losing weight because of what I’m dealing with as someone with PCOS, I felt really discouraged, and I feel like I was overworking myself while trying to lose weight.

For a long time I’ve wanted to be the healthiest version of myself in order to avoid as much risk as I possibly can. I knew that I could either live like the women I had read about, or I could work really hard to get to a place where I feel healthy and confident about living the rest of my life."

—Kelly M. of Monroe, NY

 
 “My father wasn’t the healthiest person. He smoked, and wasn’t really healthy. He died from cancer at a young age. 74 is young these days! I don’t want to die at 74; I want to live to my 90s, have a nice long life, see my kids grow up, and see my grandkids grow up.  When my dad was in the hospital for cancer, he was ten blocks down from where I lived in the city. I was there first thing in the morning, before work, and I went there after work. I stayed with him two to three hours every day. I didn’t have time to go to the gym. That’s when I put on a lot of weight.  I didn’t have a specific turning point, I just got sick of being unhealthy and fat. I can’t do this anymore. I don’t feel like buying new clothes. I don’t feel like having trouble bending over, my stomach in the way when I’m putting on my sneakers.  I want to have a long life with my beautiful wife, see our kids grow up, and live to see our grandchildren. Eating healthy, going to the gym every day, and getting the right amount of sleep are things we talk about every day at RD, and those are the things that will help me live longer.”  —Rob D. of Highland Mills, NY

“My father wasn’t the healthiest person. He smoked, and wasn’t really healthy. He died from cancer at a young age. 74 is young these days! I don’t want to die at 74; I want to live to my 90s, have a nice long life, see my kids grow up, and see my grandkids grow up.

When my dad was in the hospital for cancer, he was ten blocks down from where I lived in the city. I was there first thing in the morning, before work, and I went there after work. I stayed with him two to three hours every day. I didn’t have time to go to the gym. That’s when I put on a lot of weight.

I didn’t have a specific turning point, I just got sick of being unhealthy and fat. I can’t do this anymore. I don’t feel like buying new clothes. I don’t feel like having trouble bending over, my stomach in the way when I’m putting on my sneakers.

I want to have a long life with my beautiful wife, see our kids grow up, and live to see our grandchildren. Eating healthy, going to the gym every day, and getting the right amount of sleep are things we talk about every day at RD, and those are the things that will help me live longer.”

—Rob D. of Highland Mills, NY

 
 "Before weight training, I counted calories, points, weight watcher points; I was definitely a food counter. Some health issues run in my family and I have put on some pounds in my day, but I didn’t want to let myself go down that path.  In chiropractic school, everybody was active. One of my roommates in the first year at school said she was going to run two miles before class everyday. I said, “Oh, I’ll do that with you.” And that’s how I started running.  I’ve done everything from a 5K to multiple marathons. I started to get into weight training when I signed up for my first marathon because I knew in order to finish 26 miles strong, I’d to have a strong core. Weight training also helped me get out of counting my food. Since I was trying to building muscle, I just naturally ate.  Most people people who meet me now say, “Oh, you’re so thin,” and I tell them it’s because I worked for it. There were many mornings that I was up at 4:00 A.M. to run 20 miles before I went to work at 9:00 A.M. So, it didn’t come without hard work.  That’s why I plan to be fit for life. I want to be able to move if I have kids. I want to be 80 years old and get myself off the toilet. I say this to so many people; you squat so that you can get off the toilet when you’re 80. Yeah, aesthetics are nice, but it’s really about functional things- so I could do things in my life, be healthy, and not get injured."  —Jodi C. of Otisville, NY, Chiropractor at Wellness Springs of Highland Mills, NY

"Before weight training, I counted calories, points, weight watcher points; I was definitely a food counter. Some health issues run in my family and I have put on some pounds in my day, but I didn’t want to let myself go down that path.

In chiropractic school, everybody was active. One of my roommates in the first year at school said she was going to run two miles before class everyday. I said, “Oh, I’ll do that with you.” And that’s how I started running.

I’ve done everything from a 5K to multiple marathons. I started to get into weight training when I signed up for my first marathon because I knew in order to finish 26 miles strong, I’d to have a strong core. Weight training also helped me get out of counting my food. Since I was trying to building muscle, I just naturally ate.

Most people people who meet me now say, “Oh, you’re so thin,” and I tell them it’s because I worked for it. There were many mornings that I was up at 4:00 A.M. to run 20 miles before I went to work at 9:00 A.M. So, it didn’t come without hard work.

That’s why I plan to be fit for life. I want to be able to move if I have kids. I want to be 80 years old and get myself off the toilet. I say this to so many people; you squat so that you can get off the toilet when you’re 80. Yeah, aesthetics are nice, but it’s really about functional things- so I could do things in my life, be healthy, and not get injured."

—Jodi C. of Otisville, NY, Chiropractor at Wellness Springs of Highland Mills, NY

 
 "My initial 'why' for joining Results Driven was a bone density issue; I was told to do weight bearing exercise. Recently, however, my 'why' has become more about my body image. This became apparent to me in a conversation I had with my daughter during which she thanked me for giving her a confident self-image, mentally and physically.  I realized I’d spent years chasing the idea of being comfortable in my own body. I joined gyms, did lots of cardio and tried to eat what I thought was a healthy diet. Yet I left the house so many mornings feeling insecure about how I looked.  Within a few months of joining Results Driven, something happened. I began to not only see, but to feel a difference in how I felt about my body. Getting dressed in the morning is less of a chore. I feel good and I feel strong. RD has helped me develop a positive self-image.  I enjoy my workouts and I’ve learned that fitness is a lifestyle. I’ve learned about nutrition and how my body works and most importantly, what it is capable of.  Results Driven has helped me develop confidence, and it feels pretty damn good.”  —Theresa W. of Highland Mills, NY

"My initial 'why' for joining Results Driven was a bone density issue; I was told to do weight bearing exercise. Recently, however, my 'why' has become more about my body image. This became apparent to me in a conversation I had with my daughter during which she thanked me for giving her a confident self-image, mentally and physically.

I realized I’d spent years chasing the idea of being comfortable in my own body. I joined gyms, did lots of cardio and tried to eat what I thought was a healthy diet. Yet I left the house so many mornings feeling insecure about how I looked.

Within a few months of joining Results Driven, something happened. I began to not only see, but to feel a difference in how I felt about my body. Getting dressed in the morning is less of a chore. I feel good and I feel strong. RD has helped me develop a positive self-image.

I enjoy my workouts and I’ve learned that fitness is a lifestyle. I’ve learned about nutrition and how my body works and most importantly, what it is capable of.

Results Driven has helped me develop confidence, and it feels pretty damn good.”

—Theresa W. of Highland Mills, NY

 
 "I was 19, in college, and going to a Bally’s gym. I thought I was going to a high impact aerobic class, and ended up landing in a Yoga class by accident. So I’m 19, and the teacher of that class was 69 years old and her name was Lovey.  It did not take long for me to realize that Lovey was stronger than I was, more flexible, had better balance, and could do a lot of things at 50 years my senior, that I couldn’t do.  That’s when I decided that’s what I want; I wanted to do something for my whole life so that I could be well and I could age well.  It’s been this life-long process of knowing that every choice mattered. Every day mattered. If I wanted to age well and strong like Lovey, everything that I chose in terms of what I was going to eat, what I was going to think, how I was going to move, those all were sort of like money in the bank for when I get older. And I was either making a deposit every day, or I was kind of making a withdrawal. And I just want to make more deposits."  Dr. Maria Perri of Highland Mills, NY, Owner of Wellness Springs of Highland Mills, NY

"I was 19, in college, and going to a Bally’s gym. I thought I was going to a high impact aerobic class, and ended up landing in a Yoga class by accident. So I’m 19, and the teacher of that class was 69 years old and her name was Lovey.

It did not take long for me to realize that Lovey was stronger than I was, more flexible, had better balance, and could do a lot of things at 50 years my senior, that I couldn’t do.

That’s when I decided that’s what I want; I wanted to do something for my whole life so that I could be well and I could age well.

It’s been this life-long process of knowing that every choice mattered. Every day mattered. If I wanted to age well and strong like Lovey, everything that I chose in terms of what I was going to eat, what I was going to think, how I was going to move, those all were sort of like money in the bank for when I get older. And I was either making a deposit every day, or I was kind of making a withdrawal. And I just want to make more deposits."

Dr. Maria Perri of Highland Mills, NY, Owner of Wellness Springs of Highland Mills, NY

 
 "I’ve always been fairly active; splitting wood, hiking and kayaking. Growing up as kids, we’d do a lot of camping, I was in the boy scouts. We did all that stuff. I’ve never been a gym member and never really thought that I needed to. I always felt that just being active was enough and never really took a liking to going indoors to work out. That, to me, was something that didn’t sit well.  At some point, I started having a lot of problems with my back, with my neck, with a lot of my joints. I just figured it was old age setting in. My step-son said I used to walk around like the Tin Man of the Wizard of Oz. I had very poor mobility in most of my joints, my hips, my knees, my ankles. These little nuisances that I had, they all incapacitated me. It’s a pain in the ass when you’re driving and you can’t turn your neck.  Joining RD has helped me tremendously with all of those problems. Any type of daily activity, I just feel stronger. Being outside for me is a special place I can go to and just escape. When I’m out riding in the woods, it’s challenging and I feel good because I’m in a much better physical condition, so I can enjoy it more. It’s just me and my heartbeat and the woods and nature and that’s what I like."  —Kevin D. of Highland Mills, NY

"I’ve always been fairly active; splitting wood, hiking and kayaking. Growing up as kids, we’d do a lot of camping, I was in the boy scouts. We did all that stuff. I’ve never been a gym member and never really thought that I needed to. I always felt that just being active was enough and never really took a liking to going indoors to work out. That, to me, was something that didn’t sit well.

At some point, I started having a lot of problems with my back, with my neck, with a lot of my joints. I just figured it was old age setting in. My step-son said I used to walk around like the Tin Man of the Wizard of Oz. I had very poor mobility in most of my joints, my hips, my knees, my ankles. These little nuisances that I had, they all incapacitated me. It’s a pain in the ass when you’re driving and you can’t turn your neck.

Joining RD has helped me tremendously with all of those problems. Any type of daily activity, I just feel stronger. Being outside for me is a special place I can go to and just escape. When I’m out riding in the woods, it’s challenging and I feel good because I’m in a much better physical condition, so I can enjoy it more. It’s just me and my heartbeat and the woods and nature and that’s what I like."

—Kevin D. of Highland Mills, NY

 
 "Clarity for me, which was recent, is that I don’t have so much pressure put upon myself by me and my expectations. As long as I know I’m trying and applying myself every day I know I’ll get there, wherever there is for me.  In the past, if I had to get dressed for a special occasion, I’d throw everything out of my closet. If I couldn’t find anything that fit the way I wanted it to, and didn’t look the way I wanted it to look, it would just throw me into a tailspin.  Recently, something happened. A holiday came up. What can I wear? I put on one or two and I’m said to myself, “You know what? This isn’t what I want to wear. I may not be where I want to look right now, but I’m okay with that because I feel fierce inside. So, it will get there.”  I think that’s a huge part, emotionally, psychologically, for anybody who’s working out, especially women of a certain age.If you take that expectation out of the equation, you’re going to succeed no matter what. You don’t have to self impose a deadline and that expectation that something has to happen sooner than it realistically can, because as you get older things take a different time frame than they did when you were younger. And that’s okay, and I think as long as people apply themselves every day and feel good about that, that’s what’s going to get you to wherever you want to be.  It’s a feel-good thing. It’s like an inside coming-to-terms with your effort that I think should override whatever the external visual is. I’ve got more of this to put in before I see what I want to see, and I’m okay with the time frame. Big shift."  —Darlene H. of Monroe, NY

"Clarity for me, which was recent, is that I don’t have so much pressure put upon myself by me and my expectations. As long as I know I’m trying and applying myself every day I know I’ll get there, wherever there is for me.

In the past, if I had to get dressed for a special occasion, I’d throw everything out of my closet. If I couldn’t find anything that fit the way I wanted it to, and didn’t look the way I wanted it to look, it would just throw me into a tailspin.

Recently, something happened. A holiday came up. What can I wear? I put on one or two and I’m said to myself, “You know what? This isn’t what I want to wear. I may not be where I want to look right now, but I’m okay with that because I feel fierce inside. So, it will get there.”

I think that’s a huge part, emotionally, psychologically, for anybody who’s working out, especially women of a certain age.If you take that expectation out of the equation, you’re going to succeed no matter what. You don’t have to self impose a deadline and that expectation that something has to happen sooner than it realistically can, because as you get older things take a different time frame than they did when you were younger. And that’s okay, and I think as long as people apply themselves every day and feel good about that, that’s what’s going to get you to wherever you want to be.

It’s a feel-good thing. It’s like an inside coming-to-terms with your effort that I think should override whatever the external visual is. I’ve got more of this to put in before I see what I want to see, and I’m okay with the time frame. Big shift."

—Darlene H. of Monroe, NY

 
 "Feeling healthier to me is important because I have my husband, my stepchildren, my grandkids. If I’m not healthy, I can’t be with them as much and do the things that I want to do with them, like run around, go to putt-putt golf or go swimming in the pool and race with an eight year old. If I’m not healthy, I can’t do that.  So that’s why it’s important to me. I want to do all of those things. I want to walk a golf course for 18 holes and watch my husband or step son play a tournament. Before RD, I don’t think I could have held up as well as I do now."  —Elaine H. of Monroe, NY

"Feeling healthier to me is important because I have my husband, my stepchildren, my grandkids. If I’m not healthy, I can’t be with them as much and do the things that I want to do with them, like run around, go to putt-putt golf or go swimming in the pool and race with an eight year old. If I’m not healthy, I can’t do that.

So that’s why it’s important to me. I want to do all of those things. I want to walk a golf course for 18 holes and watch my husband or step son play a tournament. Before RD, I don’t think I could have held up as well as I do now."

—Elaine H. of Monroe, NY

 "What inspires me to be here is that I was always a fit person. I ran all the way from high school into college, and took some time off, but then I ran again. I’ve always been a fit person until I stopped and I wasn’t.  I like myself better when I’m fit. I think my family likes me better when I’m fit because I’m less grumpy. Really, coming here makes me a better person for the people around me, for my family. Being in shape and eating properly, and just being the best that I can makes me a better person everywhere else. That’s what keeps me going, because I can see that, and I can see how much better I am now than I was eight months ago."  —Micah H. of Monroe, NY

"What inspires me to be here is that I was always a fit person. I ran all the way from high school into college, and took some time off, but then I ran again. I’ve always been a fit person until I stopped and I wasn’t.

I like myself better when I’m fit. I think my family likes me better when I’m fit because I’m less grumpy. Really, coming here makes me a better person for the people around me, for my family. Being in shape and eating properly, and just being the best that I can makes me a better person everywhere else. That’s what keeps me going, because I can see that, and I can see how much better I am now than I was eight months ago."

—Micah H. of Monroe, NY

 
 "Inspiration for me comes in a few different forms. One of them is my children, especially my daughter. I want to be a strong and healthy role model for them. My daughter gets so excited every time we pass by RD and she always points out, “There’s your gym with the ropes!”  The other end of the inspiration and motivation is the people I am surrounded with each time I am here. The energy in a team training, or even in a small group, is enough to push me. Depending on who I’m partnered with for the workout makes me go heavier, do more reps, etc.  I’ve also watched other members who have been here for a while and I see what they can do. It makes me want to do the same, watching the swings, seeing the barbell deadlift for example. These teammates, whether they know it or not, push me to be better each time I am here. The coaches have helped me to set goals, and now I can work toward something, or even crush it. Everyone in here pushes me to be better.  When I first joined RD almost a year ago, my initial reasons for joining were to feel better about myself. Since then my focus has shifted to be more performance based. Because I know I have the support of those around me, I feel like I can and will always do better."    —Michele R. of Monroe, NY

"Inspiration for me comes in a few different forms. One of them is my children, especially my daughter. I want to be a strong and healthy role model for them. My daughter gets so excited every time we pass by RD and she always points out, “There’s your gym with the ropes!”

The other end of the inspiration and motivation is the people I am surrounded with each time I am here. The energy in a team training, or even in a small group, is enough to push me. Depending on who I’m partnered with for the workout makes me go heavier, do more reps, etc.

I’ve also watched other members who have been here for a while and I see what they can do. It makes me want to do the same, watching the swings, seeing the barbell deadlift for example. These teammates, whether they know it or not, push me to be better each time I am here. The coaches have helped me to set goals, and now I can work toward something, or even crush it. Everyone in here pushes me to be better.

When I first joined RD almost a year ago, my initial reasons for joining were to feel better about myself. Since then my focus has shifted to be more performance based. Because I know I have the support of those around me, I feel like I can and will always do better."

—Michele R. of Monroe, NY

 
 "You know, what inspires me is my family. I have two beautiful daughters, and I want to be around for them. I’ve already danced with them on their sweet sixteen, so I want to have that dance at their wedding. I want to walk them down the aisle.  It’s funny because when you don’t feel good, when you feel sluggish or sick, you don’t know how long you’re going to be feeling this way, and it can feel scary. But being here, exercising, feeling energetic, having more to do, less stress, puts me in a position where I can say, “You know what? I’m going to be around for a while, and I’m going to be healthy.” My daughters are going to be happy for that, and I’m going to be happy to be part of their lives for a very long time.  So, inspiration? I don’t have to look far. I just kind of look at my wife and my two daughters, who are what I live for. And that’s what working out means to me: stay here for a while, enjoy life, enjoy your family, and move forward."  —Wilson C. of Monroe, NY

"You know, what inspires me is my family. I have two beautiful daughters, and I want to be around for them. I’ve already danced with them on their sweet sixteen, so I want to have that dance at their wedding. I want to walk them down the aisle.

It’s funny because when you don’t feel good, when you feel sluggish or sick, you don’t know how long you’re going to be feeling this way, and it can feel scary. But being here, exercising, feeling energetic, having more to do, less stress, puts me in a position where I can say, “You know what? I’m going to be around for a while, and I’m going to be healthy.” My daughters are going to be happy for that, and I’m going to be happy to be part of their lives for a very long time.

So, inspiration? I don’t have to look far. I just kind of look at my wife and my two daughters, who are what I live for. And that’s what working out means to me: stay here for a while, enjoy life, enjoy your family, and move forward."

—Wilson C. of Monroe, NY

 
 "I want to live a simpler life. Society tells you that you need all this money and all these things, and you need to look a certain way and feel a certain way. I kind of want to erase and ignore what people think we need, and do what we actually need to, which is be with family, find careers that suit our life style and don’t stress us out to a crazy extent and allow us to do things that we enjoy.  I’m de-cluttering my house right now. I’m taking out things that I don’t need, that I don’t use, and I’m not buying anything else. I found myself overwhelmed with stuff. I have a relatively small place, so I don’t have room for a lot of things. Like a toy that my daughter got, she literally looked at it for four seconds and now it’s in the corner when she would rather play outside with rocks.  So I’m taking her mindset as to what enjoying life is really about. It’s not about the gadgets and gizmos and the flare that I think we’re sold all the time. It’s about being with people we care about and doing things that are good for our bodies and good for our minds. And I think if we eliminate a lot of the BS that is constantly fed to us, we can be happier and feel less stress."  —Emma M. of Central Valley, NY

"I want to live a simpler life. Society tells you that you need all this money and all these things, and you need to look a certain way and feel a certain way. I kind of want to erase and ignore what people think we need, and do what we actually need to, which is be with family, find careers that suit our life style and don’t stress us out to a crazy extent and allow us to do things that we enjoy.

I’m de-cluttering my house right now. I’m taking out things that I don’t need, that I don’t use, and I’m not buying anything else. I found myself overwhelmed with stuff. I have a relatively small place, so I don’t have room for a lot of things. Like a toy that my daughter got, she literally looked at it for four seconds and now it’s in the corner when she would rather play outside with rocks.

So I’m taking her mindset as to what enjoying life is really about. It’s not about the gadgets and gizmos and the flare that I think we’re sold all the time. It’s about being with people we care about and doing things that are good for our bodies and good for our minds. And I think if we eliminate a lot of the BS that is constantly fed to us, we can be happier and feel less stress."

—Emma M. of Central Valley, NY

 
 "I’ve always been overweight. At one point in time I was closer to 300 pounds. I knew something had to change. My knees were hurting already, being that overweight. I was active. I played softball and volleyball back in high school but then after high school, going into college, I was still overweight.  That’s when I started exercising a little more. I did lose about 100 pounds, I put back about 40, which is ok. I just knew I had to do something extra, so coming back into the gym and being in a place that I enjoy coming to every day was important.  For me, exercise is mostly about being healthy. I’m getting to a point that I’m getting older and my fear is not being able to move around still. I’ve seen my mom, and she has hard times. I love her to death, but I know if she worked out a little bit more she would be healthier, too. So I know if I start now, being 37 years old, in the future I won’t have to worry about as much. I’m trying to prolong the diabetes as long as possible. Heart problems run in my family too, so the more I can keep my heart healthy now, I can prolong all that for the future."  —Nina S. of Monroe, NY

"I’ve always been overweight. At one point in time I was closer to 300 pounds. I knew something had to change. My knees were hurting already, being that overweight. I was active. I played softball and volleyball back in high school but then after high school, going into college, I was still overweight.

That’s when I started exercising a little more. I did lose about 100 pounds, I put back about 40, which is ok. I just knew I had to do something extra, so coming back into the gym and being in a place that I enjoy coming to every day was important.

For me, exercise is mostly about being healthy. I’m getting to a point that I’m getting older and my fear is not being able to move around still. I’ve seen my mom, and she has hard times. I love her to death, but I know if she worked out a little bit more she would be healthier, too. So I know if I start now, being 37 years old, in the future I won’t have to worry about as much. I’m trying to prolong the diabetes as long as possible. Heart problems run in my family too, so the more I can keep my heart healthy now, I can prolong all that for the future."

—Nina S. of Monroe, NY

 
 "I got very sick. Within a year I had a pulmonary embolism and two or three months after that I was diagnosed with cancer. I went through radiation, then, after, I started getting better and the doctor’s appointments were less and less. So I said, “Instead of going to the doctor’s, I’m going to go somewhere where I can get healthier.”  I was a member at a local gym; I would walk in there and feel lost. Here, there’s somebody telling you, “Okay, now do this, and then do that.” That’s what I need. I know nothing about fitness, so I need somebody to tell me, “Okay, do it like this.” That’s what I love the most.  Now it feels great to be strong. Not only do I see it here in the gym, but when I go home and I’m lifting a couple of loads of laundry. Well, it doesn’t feel that bad anymore. I guess since I’m more active, running up and down my house to go do laundry downstairs is like nothing. I’m like, “All right.” I see the changes in the little things, you know. Not just here in the gym.  My husband reminds me, “I want you healthy,” and at the end of the day, when I go to lay down at night, I think, “All right. I feel good about myself.” That’s what’s important to me."  —Elba P. of Monroe, NY

"I got very sick. Within a year I had a pulmonary embolism and two or three months after that I was diagnosed with cancer. I went through radiation, then, after, I started getting better and the doctor’s appointments were less and less. So I said, “Instead of going to the doctor’s, I’m going to go somewhere where I can get healthier.”

I was a member at a local gym; I would walk in there and feel lost. Here, there’s somebody telling you, “Okay, now do this, and then do that.” That’s what I need. I know nothing about fitness, so I need somebody to tell me, “Okay, do it like this.” That’s what I love the most.

Now it feels great to be strong. Not only do I see it here in the gym, but when I go home and I’m lifting a couple of loads of laundry. Well, it doesn’t feel that bad anymore. I guess since I’m more active, running up and down my house to go do laundry downstairs is like nothing. I’m like, “All right.” I see the changes in the little things, you know. Not just here in the gym.

My husband reminds me, “I want you healthy,” and at the end of the day, when I go to lay down at night, I think, “All right. I feel good about myself.” That’s what’s important to me."

—Elba P. of Monroe, NY

 
 "So, when I started at Results Driven, I did have the trouble with my hands, but I didn’t miss a beat. I still came to the gym, even after having that little hand surgery.  My mom always had chronic pain. Always chronic pain, and I just felt like if I took better care of myself, that I wouldn’t be burdened with that. I don’t know if it’s a genetic thing or if it’s just circumstance, but I know that if you’re stronger, you have a better chance of avoiding the kind of pain she dealt with.  In the mid 90s I started weight lifting. I always lifted after that because being strong made me feel good and it gave me more energy.  So, I’ll never stop exercising. And now, RD has given me some of the knowledge I need to stay fit and work around my aches and pains. I’m so happy to learn just the little things to think about that make a big difference in how I feel.  For me, learning is always happening. It’s probably why I haven’t ever taken a break since I started two and a half years ago."  —Maureen Z. of Monroe, NY

"So, when I started at Results Driven, I did have the trouble with my hands, but I didn’t miss a beat. I still came to the gym, even after having that little hand surgery.

My mom always had chronic pain. Always chronic pain, and I just felt like if I took better care of myself, that I wouldn’t be burdened with that. I don’t know if it’s a genetic thing or if it’s just circumstance, but I know that if you’re stronger, you have a better chance of avoiding the kind of pain she dealt with.

In the mid 90s I started weight lifting. I always lifted after that because being strong made me feel good and it gave me more energy.

So, I’ll never stop exercising. And now, RD has given me some of the knowledge I need to stay fit and work around my aches and pains. I’m so happy to learn just the little things to think about that make a big difference in how I feel.

For me, learning is always happening. It’s probably why I haven’t ever taken a break since I started two and a half years ago."

—Maureen Z. of Monroe, NY

 
 "I realized I had a body image issue as a kid. I remember comparing myself to others, “Oh, I don’t look like that, I need to wear a tankini,” and always sucking my stomach in. Then, as I got older, I gained a lot of weight and looking in the mirror, I felt disassociated, and really not connected to my body. That was the most difficult part.  Going from there, I can’t remember a point at which I kind of started to change, but I remember starting to feel good about myself and feeling good about my body. Even though I’m in a better place now, I still struggle with everything: body image, fitness goals, food, you name it. It’s just taking it one day at a time and just trying to be gentle with myself and not be so hard on myself, because life’s not supposed to be so serious."  —Jenna D. of Monroe, NY

"I realized I had a body image issue as a kid. I remember comparing myself to others, “Oh, I don’t look like that, I need to wear a tankini,” and always sucking my stomach in. Then, as I got older, I gained a lot of weight and looking in the mirror, I felt disassociated, and really not connected to my body. That was the most difficult part.

Going from there, I can’t remember a point at which I kind of started to change, but I remember starting to feel good about myself and feeling good about my body. Even though I’m in a better place now, I still struggle with everything: body image, fitness goals, food, you name it. It’s just taking it one day at a time and just trying to be gentle with myself and not be so hard on myself, because life’s not supposed to be so serious."

—Jenna D. of Monroe, NY

 
 "One of my favorite things about coaching is the connection that I have with the clients. My favorite thing in life is connections with other people, so having a job where I get to do that on a daily basis is awesome.  The connections that I’m making with our members actually improves their lives, so I feel really good about that. All the little things that they do, whether it’s going up in weight, or progressing from a deadlift to a swing, or going down in body fat makes me feel like I did it myself. It’s a really good feeling!  Health and fitness have been a battle for me since I was a young kid. Growing up, I had a very sedentary lifestyle. I was a violinist and that exercised my brain, but it didn’t exercise my body. I would say I grew up with some bad body image, but in my early twenties I decided to start working out and eating better, and it changed my life for the better.  It’s still is a struggle. When you add in another job or stress of owning a home, things like meal prepping and getting in my workouts are hard to maintain. Learning how my clients do it when they’re balancing families, daily life, and their jobs, is a motivation for me.  I feel like it’s a reciprocal relationship with clients and the coaches. They need us, but we need them, too. We keep each other going."  —Coach Andrea of New Windsor, NY

"One of my favorite things about coaching is the connection that I have with the clients. My favorite thing in life is connections with other people, so having a job where I get to do that on a daily basis is awesome.

The connections that I’m making with our members actually improves their lives, so I feel really good about that. All the little things that they do, whether it’s going up in weight, or progressing from a deadlift to a swing, or going down in body fat makes me feel like I did it myself. It’s a really good feeling!

Health and fitness have been a battle for me since I was a young kid. Growing up, I had a very sedentary lifestyle. I was a violinist and that exercised my brain, but it didn’t exercise my body. I would say I grew up with some bad body image, but in my early twenties I decided to start working out and eating better, and it changed my life for the better.

It’s still is a struggle. When you add in another job or stress of owning a home, things like meal prepping and getting in my workouts are hard to maintain. Learning how my clients do it when they’re balancing families, daily life, and their jobs, is a motivation for me.

I feel like it’s a reciprocal relationship with clients and the coaches. They need us, but we need them, too. We keep each other going."

—Coach Andrea of New Windsor, NY

 
 "When I think of fitness and the kind of people who were like, “I’m going to be in shape,” they were the ones going to the gym four days a week, bench pressing everything. I tried it in the past, but I’d go to the gym and I didn’t know what I was doing, and the next day I could barely move because I felt like when you go to the gym, you should be working out hard. Then you do that, and you can’t move the next day. I just felt this idea of, “Maybe I’m just not that kind of guy?”  At the same time, I feel like I’m getting to the point where if I don’t start to do something now, then it might be too late. So, I felt that this was a good point in my life to buckle down and take care of myself.  Kind of suddenly, recently, there was a death in the family of somebody who just wasn’t in their best health.  I’d like to have a family one day, and I would like to be around for a long time."  —Mike M. of Chester, NY

"When I think of fitness and the kind of people who were like, “I’m going to be in shape,” they were the ones going to the gym four days a week, bench pressing everything. I tried it in the past, but I’d go to the gym and I didn’t know what I was doing, and the next day I could barely move because I felt like when you go to the gym, you should be working out hard. Then you do that, and
you can’t move the next day.
I just felt this idea of, “Maybe I’m just not that kind of guy?”

At the same time, I feel like I’m getting to the point where if I don’t start to do something now, then it might be too late. So, I felt that this was a good point in my life to buckle down and take care of myself.

Kind of suddenly, recently, there was a death in the family of somebody who just wasn’t in their best health.

I’d like to have a family one day, and I would like to be around for a long time."

—Mike M. of Chester, NY

 
 "I’ve always been active. Growing up I played soccer and volleyball, and have always loved theatre throughout my whole life.  When I graduated, the thing that I think was missing was just a healthy outlet for me. I did theater, which I truly enjoyed, but it was long hours and I wasn’t eating well. Theatre was a way for me to be someone else for a little while, which I really enjoyed. I liked the escape. I almost feel like working out is a similar thing. When I’m acting, I’m totally in the zone being that character. When I’m here, I feel like I’m in the zone and being this other version of myself.  Previously, I worked out because I didn’t feel good about myself. I didn’t think I looked good, and I wanted to change that. I didn’t know how to change it though, so I would do ridiculous Youtube dance workouts, walk a lot and eat junk food.   Now, my mindset is that I have to eat well in order to feel good. I really enjoy working out. I like coming here and seeing the people that I see almost every day. I’m able to accomplish things I never thought I could physically."  —Sarah F. of Cornwall, NY

"I’ve always been active. Growing up I played soccer and volleyball, and have always loved theatre throughout my whole life.

When I graduated, the thing that I think was missing was just a healthy outlet for me. I did theater, which I truly enjoyed, but it was long hours and I wasn’t eating well. Theatre was a way for me to be someone else for a little while, which I really enjoyed. I liked the escape. I almost feel like working out is a similar thing. When I’m acting, I’m totally in the zone being that character. When I’m here, I feel like I’m in the zone and being this other version of myself.

Previously, I worked out because I didn’t feel good about myself. I didn’t think I looked good, and I wanted to change that. I didn’t know how to change it though, so I would do ridiculous Youtube dance workouts, walk a lot and eat junk food.


Now, my mindset is that I have to eat well in order to feel good. I really enjoy working out. I like coming here and seeing the people that I see almost every day. I’m able to accomplish things I never thought I could physically."

—Sarah F. of Cornwall, NY

 
 "It's a funny thing being a coach, because people automatically assume that we've got it all together from a fitness standpoint. People assume that fitness comes easy to us, and really the other side of it, health comes easy to us.  My start with fitness was the stereotypical wanting to get strong, get better for sports, just get in better shape. I really got serious with it when I got really sick.  I'll never forget sitting in the cardiac section of the hospital in Tampa, Florida. I was at a Rays versus Yankees game, and I had an asthma attack. My resting heart rate was 140. I remember the sound of the beeping, and the feeling of being in a hospital gown, and being a 20 something year old guy failing a stress test. That night, I wasn’t allowed to be released because they were afraid I was not stable enough to survive the night.  I had a lot of things wrong, asthma, eczema, digestive issues, and I was always told that nothing was wrong. I just started to go deeper and deeper down the rabbit hole with fitness and nutrition. I eventually figured out it was celiac, which had some other autoimmune components. This made me realize that it's your responsibility. If your health is falling apart, you have nobody to blame other than yourself. For me, there were a lot of little things I was ignoring. I was ignoring signs that I wasn't healthy.  Through some really good quality coaches and mentors, I was able to gain my own health back. I'll never let my fitness get away from me, even though it does try pretty frequently to slide away. This is why I can't see myself doing anything else other than coaching, because if I can spend the numerous hours I do per week sitting here waiting for the opportunity to be the catalyst for change for somebody else who needs to regain their health, there's nothing better than that."  —Coach Ed McKay of Central Valley, NY

"It's a funny thing being a coach, because people automatically assume that we've got it all together from a fitness standpoint. People assume that fitness comes easy to us, and really the other side of it, health comes easy to us.

My start with fitness was the stereotypical wanting to get strong, get better for sports, just get in better shape. I really got serious with it when I got really sick.

I'll never forget sitting in the cardiac section of the hospital in Tampa, Florida. I was at a Rays versus Yankees game, and I had an asthma attack. My resting heart rate was 140. I remember the sound of the beeping, and the feeling of being in a hospital gown, and being a 20 something year old guy failing a stress test. That night, I wasn’t allowed to be released because they were afraid I was not stable enough to survive the night.

I had a lot of things wrong, asthma, eczema, digestive issues, and I was always told that nothing was wrong. I just started to go deeper and deeper down the rabbit hole with fitness and nutrition. I eventually figured out it was celiac, which had some other autoimmune components. This made me realize that it's your responsibility. If your health is falling apart, you have nobody to blame other than yourself. For me, there were a lot of little things I was ignoring. I was ignoring signs that I wasn't healthy.

Through some really good quality coaches and mentors, I was able to gain my own health back. I'll never let my fitness get away from me, even though it does try pretty frequently to slide away. This is why I can't see myself doing anything else other than coaching, because if I can spend the numerous hours I do per week sitting here waiting for the opportunity to be the catalyst for change for somebody else who needs to regain their health, there's nothing better than that."

—Coach Ed McKay of Central Valley, NY

 
 "To me, being a coach means sacrifice. When I first started working for Results Driven I had two jobs, and then acquired a third. I worked in radio, I was a DJ for a wedding company, and I started working here. There were crazy stretches for a year where Wednesday morning I’d commute from Newburgh to Monroe to coach a 6:00 AM class. I'd get up at 4:30, get down here by 6:00, do the 6:00 AM class, then drive back home, quick shower, eat breakfast, and get to work. Work a normal day, then get in the car, drive back down to Monroe from Fishkill and then coach from 5:30 until 8:30 or 9:30 when we finished cleaning. Go home, sleep, wake up the next morning at 4:30, go back down to Monroe, coach, go back to work, and then come back down to Monroe on Thursday night, coach one or two sessions, workout at 7:30, and then eat tacos.  That was 3 years ago, but even now most weeks I'm here at least 40, 50, close to 60 hours a week trying to make sure I'm up-to-date on my learning, marketing, and the business. I think that's one thing when you're becoming a coach that you don't expect, is how much work it's going to be. Being frustrated, tired, and caring so much about all of our members is taxing, both emotionally and physically. We get sick. We look forward to two days in a row off, because we don't typically get them.  It's a lot of work and sacrifice. The cool thing is that it pays off. We see people grow, flourish, and regain some of their youth and function. They can pick up their grandchildren when they're 70 years old, and they can also hang and swing a kettlebell. People who are almost 70 and are thinking about retiring are deadlifting 32 kilogram bells.  It's very impressive what we're able to do with our system. Being a coach is a lot of sacrifice, but in the end, giving up your time is for a greater good."  —Coach Mike Toole of Newburgh, NY

"To me, being a coach means sacrifice. When I first started working for Results Driven I had two jobs, and then acquired a third. I worked in radio, I was a DJ for a wedding company, and I started working here. There were crazy stretches for a year where Wednesday morning I’d commute from Newburgh to Monroe to coach a 6:00 AM class. I'd get up at 4:30, get down here by 6:00, do the 6:00 AM class, then drive back home, quick shower, eat breakfast, and get to work. Work a normal day, then get in the car, drive back down to Monroe from Fishkill and then coach from 5:30 until 8:30 or 9:30 when we finished cleaning. Go home, sleep, wake up the next morning at 4:30, go back down to Monroe, coach, go back to work, and then come back down to Monroe on Thursday night, coach one or two sessions, workout at 7:30, and then eat tacos.

That was 3 years ago, but even now most weeks I'm here at least 40, 50, close to 60 hours a week trying to make sure I'm up-to-date on my learning, marketing, and the business. I think that's one thing when you're becoming a coach that you don't expect, is how much work it's going to be. Being frustrated, tired, and caring so much about all of our members is taxing, both emotionally and physically. We get sick. We look forward to two days in a row off, because we don't typically get them.

It's a lot of work and sacrifice. The cool thing is that it pays off. We see people grow, flourish, and regain some of their youth and function. They can pick up their grandchildren when they're 70 years old, and they can also hang and swing a kettlebell. People who are almost 70 and are thinking about retiring are deadlifting 32 kilogram bells.

It's very impressive what we're able to do with our system. Being a coach is a lot of sacrifice, but in the end, giving up your time is for a greater good."

—Coach Mike Toole of Newburgh, NY

 
 "I’d invested 20 years into a career. I also chose to have children and raise a family. After 20 years, it became pretty evident to my husband and I that one of us needed to leave the workforce to invest in our home and the rearing of our children. With their ages being 16, 13 and 9, it was time for there to be a presence in the home for them. I drew that straw.  I lost a lot when I left that job; I lost belonging somewhere, I lost adult speak, I lost camaraderie, I lost some power, some decision making. When the kids go to school, there are a lot of lonely hours, so I thought, “This is the absolute right time for me to completely reinvest in myself, take my goals and my training and invest the effort that I no longer invest in that part of my world and translate it into this one.”  The passion that I had around my career is now channeled into something new. It’s about me and my fitness, and finding this particular gym (Results Driven) has given me an outlet. It gave me back so much of what I left.  I like being around people, I like helping people, I like eye opening moments for people around me. I like being part of something and I’m having a great time here. So much so that RD is allowing me to rediscover myself under a new career. This is a great opportunity to try something new that I’m passionate about, that I can channel energy and effort into, and I’m excited again!"  —Janine F. of Monroe, N.Y.

"I’d invested 20 years into a career. I also chose to have children and raise a family. After 20 years, it became pretty evident to my husband and I that one of us needed to leave the workforce to invest in our home and the rearing of our children. With their ages being 16, 13 and 9, it was time for there to be a presence in the home for them. I drew that straw.

I lost a lot when I left that job; I lost belonging somewhere, I lost adult speak, I lost camaraderie, I lost some power, some decision making. When the kids go to school, there are a lot of lonely hours, so I thought, “This is the absolute right time for me to completely reinvest in myself, take my goals and my training and invest the effort that I no longer invest in that part of my world and translate it into this one.”

The passion that I had around my career is now channeled into something new. It’s about me and my fitness, and finding this particular gym (Results Driven) has given me an outlet. It gave me back so much of what I left.

I like being around people, I like helping people, I like eye opening moments for people around me. I like being part of something and I’m having a great time here. So much so that RD is allowing me to rediscover myself under a new career. This is a great opportunity to try something new that I’m passionate about, that I can channel energy and effort into, and I’m excited again!"

—Janine F. of Monroe, N.Y.

 
 "For me, serving in the Army is a heart thing. It comes from the heart; it comes from the depth of who I am.  Being a Human Resources Officer, dealing with personnel, my sole focus is to make sure our soldiers are getting paid, getting their medical insurance, life insurance, and that their families are being taken care of. The common thread among every soldier is that we’re still human.  I’ll never forget, I was a second lieutenant in Korea (my first duty station), and this soldier had a sick child that they absolutely had to get back to the US for more efficient medical care. I processed his paper work, his packet, all the way up so he would be able to be released in a timely manner. This soldier, I forgot who he was and went on about my daily duties. Months later, he sees me in the exchange, just shopping and grabbing lunch, and he walks up to me and says, “Ma’am, you don’t know what you did for my family.”  We’re still people at the end of the day and our sole focus is that our families are taken care of, whether you’re single or married. Then I can go out there and completely focus on this mission that, at any given time, I could give the ultimate sacrifice, which is my life.  —Ashley L. of Highland Falls, NY

"For me, serving in the Army is a heart thing. It comes from the heart; it comes from the depth of who I am.

Being a Human Resources Officer, dealing with personnel, my sole focus is to make sure our soldiers are getting paid, getting their medical insurance, life insurance, and that their families are being taken care of. The common thread among every soldier is that we’re still human.

I’ll never forget, I was a second lieutenant in Korea (my first duty station), and this soldier had a sick child that they absolutely had to get back to the US for more efficient medical care. I processed his paper work, his packet, all the way up so he would be able to be released in a timely manner. This soldier, I forgot who he was and went on about my daily duties. Months later, he sees me in the exchange, just shopping and grabbing lunch, and he walks up to me and says, “Ma’am, you don’t know what you did for my family.”

We’re still people at the end of the day and our sole focus is that our families are taken care of, whether you’re single or married. Then I can go out there and completely focus on this mission that, at any given time, I could give the ultimate sacrifice, which is my life.

—Ashley L. of Highland Falls, NY

 
 “When I started at RD, my circle of friends who were 62, 63, 64 were thinking about retirement. They were thinking about slowing down. They were thinking about getting old and they were starting to have problems. I was starting to have problems with my sugar, and exercise, I don’t believe, occurred to any of us.  Exercise has allowed me to not get that old feeling inside. Yesterday, Ed showed me the photograph that he took of me, and I looked at it, and it’s a nice photograph and it does looks like me, but in my mind it looks like my mom. In my mind, I don’t look like that. I look like the person on my drivers license that’s just about 30 years old. That’s how I feel.  I don’t feel like I have been aging. I get stronger all the time. I’m capable of doing more than I ever thought I could. I haven’t slowed down. I still do a lot of gardening, I can paint, I can climb up and down ladders, I’m still installing window treatments. I don’t know if I hadn’t come, if I would have been able to do that.”  —Violet T. of Newburgh, NY

“When I started at RD, my circle of friends who were 62, 63, 64 were thinking about retirement. They were thinking about slowing down. They were thinking about getting old and they were starting to have problems. I was starting to have problems with my sugar, and exercise, I don’t believe, occurred to any of us.

Exercise has allowed me to not get that old feeling inside. Yesterday, Ed showed me the photograph that he took of me, and I looked at it, and it’s a nice photograph and it does looks like me, but in my mind it looks like my mom. In my mind, I don’t look like that. I look like the person on my drivers license that’s just about 30 years old. That’s how I feel.

I don’t feel like I have been aging. I get stronger all the time. I’m capable of doing more than I ever thought I could. I haven’t slowed down. I still do a lot of gardening, I can paint, I can climb up and down ladders, I’m still installing window treatments. I don’t know if I hadn’t come, if I would have been able to do that.”

—Violet T. of Newburgh, NY

 
 “I always knew in the back of my mind that this particular cancer could happen, I just didn’t think it would happen to me.  I can not lie, I definitely had some very dark days where I thought very negative things. You have got to have something positive to draw from. If you don’t have positive experiences in your life, you will take from your life. I am convinced.  In the doldrums and the deep, dark areas I went to when I was diagnosed, I think that the whole RD experience and people from RD helped. You’ve got to understand that I was getting texts from people here, ‘ra-ra-ra,’ ‘don’t let this stop you,’ ‘you’re a great guy.’ It made me so emotional. That’s the one thing that this diagnosis did to me; it made me a much more emotional person than I ever was.  That kind of stuff really helped me get over the fact that I have cancer. I’m a cancer person, That’s not going to go away. I’m a survivor and hopefully I will live and continue to tell this story for as many people that want to hear it.”  —Joe "MF" B. of Harriman, NY

“I always knew in the back of my mind that this particular cancer could happen, I just didn’t think it would happen to me.

I can not lie, I definitely had some very dark days where I thought very negative things. You have got to have something positive to draw from. If you don’t have positive experiences in your life, you will take from your life. I am convinced.

In the doldrums and the deep, dark areas I went to when I was diagnosed, I think that the whole RD experience and people from RD helped. You’ve got to understand that I was getting texts from people here, ‘ra-ra-ra,’ ‘don’t let this stop you,’ ‘you’re a great guy.’ It made me so emotional. That’s the one thing that this diagnosis did to me; it made me a much more emotional person than I ever was.

That kind of stuff really helped me get over the fact that I have cancer. I’m a cancer person, That’s not going to go away. I’m a survivor and hopefully I will live and continue to tell this story for as many people that want to hear it.”

—Joe "MF" B. of Harriman, NY